My Lady Jane by C. Hand, B. Ashton, J. Meadows

“Dedication: For everyone who knows there was enough room for Leonardo DiCaprio on that door. And for England. We’re really sorry for what we’re about to do to your history.”

my lady jane

Synopsis from GoodreadsThe comical, fantastical, romantical, (not) entirely true story of Lady Jane Grey. In My Lady Jane, coauthors Cynthia Hand, Brodi Ashton, and Jodi Meadows have created a one-of-a-kind fantasy in the tradition of The Princess Bride, featuring a reluctant king, an even more reluctant queen, a noble steed, and only a passing resemblance to actual history—because sometimes history needs a little help. At sixteen, Lady Jane Grey is about to be married off to a stranger and caught up in a conspiracy to rob her cousin, King Edward, of his throne. But those trifling problems aren’t for Jane to worry about. Jane is about to become the Queen of England.

Feelings: I’ve been planning to read this book all year and I”m SO GLAD that I finally did! I love when an author puts parenthesis to good use, and this trio definitely did. You guys, this book is so great. I flew through it and thought about it when I wasn’t actually reading it. I felt really connected to these characters and wanted to see how their story would play out. I want a sequel…even though that wouldn’t make sense…ha!

I loved the magical twist to history. I think the magic made sense and I liked that the authors included some backstory to it as well. The ways that the magic allowed them to rewrite history was a nice touch, as well. (Less death, more secrets)

Issues: I said I love parenthesis…and I do. I love when the author/narrator speaks to the reader and gives side notes. I think it’s so much fun. However, it was annoying in the last few pages of the book. So much was happening and then the narrators started slowing down the action by interrupting it with side bars and other information. It was still funny, it just became too much at the end.

Characters: Edward frustrated me at times, but then I remembered that he was a boy king and was just an annoying dude. Then he got out of the castle and grew up a little. I wasn’t really sure about his and Jane’s relationship for a while, but then when Gracie came along, that wonderment when away. It was cute, how he wanted to kiss her and not die at 16. I get that. When he finally left home, he became a relatable teenager and it was fun to see him stumble around as a peasant for a little while.

Jane + G = what I love about love stories. Their slow-going relationship was done really well. Sometimes authors can drag that build-up out for too long and the reader loses interest. I think this was handled in a realistic way. It made sense that there was a lack of communication and understanding between them at first. It also made sense for them to move past that stage (which doesn’t always happen). Jane gives me hope. She gives me hope that a girl who loves books and talks about them all the time can find a man who loves that she loves reading. (How many times can I use “love” in one paragraph?) G was just the right amount of romantic and manly to bring this whole love story together.

BESS. If you know me personally, then you know how much I love the history of the monarchy. It’s something I’ve always studied and read about, just because I wanted to. That’s what drew me to this book in the first place. I wasn’t expecting Bess to be in this narrative! Queen Elizabeth for the win! I loved seeing this side of her, even if it was like 80% fabricated.

Final thoughts: If you love books with little Easter egg references, some historical accuracies (with the inaccuracies done on purpose), Monty Python-style humor, and magical twists, then this is the book for you. I found it to be really refreshing and fun. I’ll definitely be reading this one again. I highly recommend it! It’s charming. You have to go into it ready for a light, silly read.

 

Goodreads rating: 4.17/5

Amazon.com rating: 4.5/5

My rating: 4.75/5

Happy reading! – Caitlyn

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5 thoughts on “My Lady Jane by C. Hand, B. Ashton, J. Meadows

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